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Patagonia Port Planner

The vast region of Patagonia includes much of southern Argentina and Chile. It owes its name, according to some accounts, to a mythical race of giants that Portuguese explorer Magellan thought he saw on these shores. This race, of course, did not exist but this remains a landscape fit for giants, with…

The vast region of Patagonia includes much of southern Argentina and Chile. It owes its name, according to some accounts, to a mythical race of giants that Portuguese explorer Magellan thought he saw on these shores. This race, of course, did not exist but this remains a landscape fit for giants, with soaring cliffs overlooking deep fjords on its Pacific side, and the towering peaks of the southern Andes dividing the two countries.For centuries these waterways have provided safe passage from ocean storms; today they offer a scenic journey of dramatic and formidable grandeur. Heading south along the Chilean coast, travelers can sail along the fjordlike channels of the country’s irregular shoreline. Rounding the bottom of South America, ships go through the Tierra del Fuego (Land of Fire), where steering around the southernmost tip of the continent, Cape Horn, has frequently challenged sailors. Most ships, however, sail along the waterways that cross the Tierra del Fuego—including the Cockburn and Beagle channels, the latter home to Glacier Alley, where six glaciers can be spotted from the decks of passing ships. Off the coast of the Argentine portion of Patagonia, the Falkland Islands are an unusual British outpost shared by 3,000 humans, 227 bird species and half a million sheep.

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