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Bordered on three sides by dramatic mountains that form a natural harbor, the idyllic town of Ísafjörður—population 2,600—serves as a charming exploration hub for the surrounding Westfjords peninsula. Settled since the 16th century, and traditionally dependent on fishing as its main source of…

Bordered on three sides by dramatic mountains that form a natural harbor, the idyllic town of Ísafjörður—population 2,600—serves as a charming exploration hub for the surrounding Westfjords peninsula. Settled since the 16th century, and traditionally dependent on fishing as its main source of income, its streets are today lined with old wooden houses interspersed with occasional shops, restaurants and cafés.

Despite its low-key atmosphere, Ísafjörður offers plenty to do, from visiting local museums and enjoying a game of golf, to hiking, biking and kayaking around the town and harbor. The town also hosts several notable events, such as Iceland's oldest cross-country ski race, the mud-football European Championships and a classical music festival, Við Djúpið.

The rugged and remote Westfjords offer many more attractions. A daily summer ferry transports visitors to the scenic Hornstrandir Nature Reserve and to Vigur, an island that's home to many protected bird populations. Follow the region’s striking coastline and you’ll find snow-streaked mountains, waterfalls and beaches.

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In Partnership with
AFAR
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In Partnership with
AFAR
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